How to Stay Current in the Workplace

Whether you’re actively pursuing employment or want to propel your current career, it’s important to make yourself marketable. Here’s how to continue to educate and advance yourself.

It’s always good to have career options. And 68% of Americans are willing to look for jobs outside their current workplace.1 If you’re on the lookout for new career opportunities — and even if you’re not — here’s how you can boost your hireability.
As much as 43% of college and university enrollment in the United States is from adult learners.2
Not everyone needs a degree to be successful, but do those degrees pay off? According to the U.S. Census Bureau the answer is yes. Over an adult’s working life, someone with a bachelor’s degree can expect to earn nearly a million dollars more over those with a high school diploma. A master’s degree is worth $1.3 million more in lifetime earnings than a high school degree, and a doctoral degree, $2.2 million. You might even see the benefits at hiring: if you have a master’s degree, the immediate raise in most states is $3,500 to $6,000, and you’ll increase your potential for earning an upper management position.

Improve your chances of boosting your current career or scoring a new one with these pointers for staying educated and hirable.

  • Go back to school. As much as 43 percent of college and university enrollment in the United States is from adult learners. An advanced degree may be essential for advancing yourself in the workforce, or it may be beneficial to enroll in continuing education classes to learn new proficiencies, such as technical or communications skills. “Make sure you do a cost-benefit analysis to see what type of education would have the biggest payoff for your career,” says Pamela Mitchell, CEO of The Reinvention Institute and author of The 10 Laws of Career Reinvention. “If you’re more senior (or wanting to move up the ladder), an advanced degree might be a good investment. But if you’re looking to round out your skill set, continuing education classes may give you a bigger bang for your buck.”

  • Join a professional organization. Seven out of 10 Americans belong to at least one professional organization.3 Memberships help you stay up-to-date on industry trends, allow you to connect with others in your field and can provide professional development opportunities.

  • Get connected by establishing a presence on social networking sites like LinkedIn and Facebook.
Pamela Mitchell, founder & CEO of The Reinvention Institute and author of The 10 Laws of Career Reinvention



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