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FICO® Credit Score

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Wells Fargo Online® customers - get your monthly FICO® Score for free

Plus tools, Wells Fargo tips and more

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Available for eligible customers

Find out where you stand and be prepared for what's next with easy access to your FICO® Score through Wells Fargo Online® . Accessing your FICO® Score through this program will not impact your credit score.

Features include:

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Your FICO® Score and Wells Fargo credit rating

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Your score factors and personalized Wells Fargo credit tips

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Your FICO® Score history

How to access:

Eligible Wells Fargo customers – on your desktop or tablet, sign on to your account and select View Your FICO® Credit Score from the Planning and Tools section of your Account Summary.  On a smartphone, select View your FICO® Credit Score at the bottom of your Account Summary.

Your FICO Credit Score link smartphone view

Desktop and tablet view

View your FICO Credit Score LINK Desktop view

Smartphone view

Note:  The FICO ® Score presented is for educational purposes and may differ from the scores that lenders use to make underwriting decisions. When applying for a new account at Wells Fargo, a unique scoring model is used which considers more than credit scores to evaluate applications.

Remember:  Accessing your FICO Score is free and will not impact your credit score.

About FICO® Scores

What is a credit score?

A credit score is a number that summarizes your credit risk to lenders, or the likelihood that you’ll pay the lender back the amount you borrowed plus interest. The score is based on a snapshot of your credit report(s) at one of the three major credit bureaus—Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®—at a particular point in time, and helps lenders evaluate your credit risk. Your credit score can influence the credit that’s available to you and the terms, such as interest rate, that lenders offer you.

What is a credit bureau?

A credit bureau, also known as a consumer reporting agency, collects and stores individual credit information and provides it to creditors so they can make decisions on granting loans and other credit activities. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders, and credit card issuers. The three largest credit bureaus in the U.S. are Equifax®, Experian®, and TransUnion®.

What are FICO® Scores?

FICO® Scores are the most widely used credit scores and are used in over 90% of U.S. lending decisions. Your FICO® Scores (you have more than one) are based on the data generated from your credit reports at the three major credit bureaus, Experian®, TransUnion® and Equifax®. Each of your FICO® Scores is a three-digit number summarizing your credit risk, that predicts how likely you are to pay back your credit obligations as agreed.

What it the highest credit score?

Most credit scoring models follow a credit score range of 300 to 850 with that 850 being the highest score you can have. However, there can be other ranges for different models, some of which are customized for a particular industry (credit card, auto lending, or insurance for example). While the majority follow the 300 to 850 range, there are some scores (e.g., FICO® Bankcard Score) that range from 250 to 900 and others that may use other score ranges. For more information on the different scoring models, view Understanding credit scores.

Why do FICO® Scores fluctuate?

There are many reasons why your score may change. The information on your credit report changes each time lenders report new activity to the credit bureau. So, as the information in your credit report at that bureau changes, your FICO® Scores may also change. Keep in mind that certain events such as late payments or bankruptcy can lower your FICO® Scores quickly.

FICO® Scores consider five main categories of information in your credit report.

  • Your payment history
  • The amount of money you currently owe
  • The length of your credit history
  • New credit accounts
  • Types of credit in use

What are the minimum requirements to produce a FICO® Score?

You can choose to opt out of seeing your score at any time. Keep in mind, you will lose your score history after 120 days if you choose to opt out. As long as you are eligible to view your FICO® Score, you will always have the ability to opt back in.

In order for a FICO® Score to be calculated, a credit report must contain these minimum requirements:

  • At least one account that has been open for six months or more.
  • At least one account that has been reported to the credit reporting agency within the past six months.
  • No indication of deceased on the credit report (Please note: if you share an account with another person and the other account holder is reported deceased, it is important to check your credit report to make sure you are not impacted).

Does a FICO® Score alone determine whether I get credit?

No. Most lenders use a number of factors to make credit decisions, including a FICO® Score. Lenders may look at information such as the amount of debt you are able to handle reasonably given your income, your employment history, and your credit history. Based on their review of this information, as well as their specific underwriting policies, lenders may extend credit to you even with a low FICO® Score, or decline your request for credit even with a high FICO® Score.

How long will negative information remain on my credit reports?

It depends on the type of negative information. Here’s the basic breakdown of how long different types of negative information will remain on your credit reports:

  • Late payments: 7 years from the original delinquency date.
  • Chapter 7 bankruptcies: 10 years from the filing date.
  • Chapter 13 bankruptcies: 7 years from the filing date.
  • Collection accounts: 7 years from the original delinquency date of the account
  • Public Record: Generally 7 years

Keep in Mind: For all of these negative items, the older they are the less impact they will have on your FICO® Scores. For example, a collection that is 5 years old will hurt much less than a collection that is 5 months old.

Are FICO® Scores unfair to minorities?

No. FICO® Scores do not consider your gender, race, nationality or marital status. In fact, the Equal Credit Opportunity Act prohibits lenders from considering this type of information when issuing credit. Independent research has shown that FICO® Scores are not unfair to minorities or people with little credit history. FICO® Scores have proven to be an accurate and consistent measure of repayment for all people who have some credit history. In other words, at a given FICO® Score, non-minority and minority applicants are equally likely to pay as agreed.

How are FICO® Scores calculated for married couples?

Married couples don’t share joint FICO® Scores; each person has their own individual credit report, which is used to calculate FICO® Scores, and isn’t impacted by their spouse’s credit history. However, married couples should be mindful of the potential impact of opening joint credit accounts. For example, if you get a new credit card in both spouses’ names, and there is a late payment on that account, the late payment will impact both individuals’ FICO® Scores.

How can I access my credit report?

By federal law, you are entitled to one free credit report every 12 months from each credit reporting company, TransUnion®, Equifax®, and Experian®. Find them at annualcreditreport.com. Take advantage of this service annually to ensure the information on your credit report is current and accurate.

 

Your FICO® Score experience on Wells Fargo Online®

Why is Wells Fargo displaying your FICO® Score?

Wells Fargo is displaying your FICO® Score for educational purposes and as a benefit to support your awareness and understanding of FICO® Credit Scores and how they may influence the credit that’s available to you. Wells Fargo does not calculate your FICO® Score; we are displaying a score that is provided to us by the credit bureau indicated on your score display. Your FICO® Score is provided through Wells Fargo Online® at no additional cost beyond your standard internet/mobile carrier fees.

Will accessing my FICO® Score from Wells Fargo negatively impact my credit score?

No. You can check your score here as often as you want without negatively impacting your credit score.

Where is Wells Fargo getting this score?

We will obtain your FICO® Score that is calculated from information in your Experian® credit report. The score provided under this service is intended for educational purposes. The FICO® Score reflects a general snapshot of your credit profile at a specific point in time and can vary month-to-month. Obtaining your FICO® Score results in a "soft inquiry" at the consumer reporting agency and does not affect your credit score.

How often will my score update?

Your FICO® Score will update monthly around the same day each month. Please note that scores reflect data from your Experian® credit report at the time it was calculated and may be from a previous period.

Does the FICO® Score I’m seeing reflect my most recent payments?

Please note that scores reflect data from your Experian® credit report at the time it was calculated and may be from a previous period. All lenders have their own reporting schedule, so you should allow 30-60 days from the time of any payments or other activity for that activity to be reported in your credit report and then reflected in your FICO® Score. If you believe your FICO® Score is incorrect or doesn’t reflect your most current activity, the first thing you should do is check your credit report. You can check your credit report from each of the three consumer reporting bureaus once per year for free at annualcreditreport.com. If you see an error or a particular lender has not reported your latest activity to the credit bureau, follow each bureau’s instructions on how to dispute the information or contact the lender directly. If you see an error associated with a Wells Fargo account, call us at 1-855-329-9605, Mon – Fri, 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Central Time, Sat 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Central Time.

Why is this FICO® Score different than other scores I’ve seen?

There are many different credit scores available to consumers and lenders. FICO® Scores are the most widely used credit scores and are the only credit scores used in over 90% of U.S. lending decisions. It’s important to know that there are also several different versions of FICO® Scores. Different lenders (such as auto lenders and credit card lenders) may use different versions of FICO® Scores. In addition, your FICO® Score is based on credit report data from a particular credit bureau, so differences in your credit reports may create differences in your FICO® Scores. The FICO® Score Wells Fargo is providing you for free is for educational purposes. When reviewing any of your credit scores from any source, take note of the date, bureau credit report source, version, and range for that particular score. For more, see Understanding credit scores.

How will I know if my FICO Score® is available?

If your account is eligible, the link to View Your FICO® Credit Score will automatically display on your Account Summary screen. Just select the link to opt in and view your FICO® Score.

Note: You can also access your FICO® Score in Spanish with your smartphone.

  • Direct your mobile browser to wellsfargo.com or download the Wells Fargo Mobile® app.
  • You can update your setting any time on the Language Preference screen. Just sign on to your account, go to the Profile and Settings menu, and select Language Preference.

I opted in, but it says, "No score is available." Why?

The most common reasons a score may not be available:

  • The credit report may not have enough information to generate a FICO® Score (at least one account must be reported in the past 6 months.)
  • The credit bureau wasn’t able to completely match your identity to your Wells Fargo Online® information. To keep your information current, sign on to Wells Fargo Online®, visit the Profile and Settings menu, select My Profile and then Update Contact Information. Make sure your email addresses, phone numbers, and mailing addresses are current.
  • If you've frozen your credit with the credit bureau, you may not immediately receive a credit score. A score should become available for you to view after the next monthly update. Contact Experian® with further questions.

Is the FICO® Score I’m seeing the same score Wells Fargo uses when I apply for a new account?

Depending on the product you are applying for, the same FICO® Score type may be used; however, some product applications will use a unique scoring model that is different than what you are seeing.

The FICO® Score provided here is for educational purposes and may differ from the scores used to make underwriting decisions. Typically, creditors and lenders, including Wells Fargo, use more specific industry credit scores that are customized for the type of credit product you’re applying for. For example, auto lenders typically use a credit score, such as a FICO® Auto Score, that is specifically designed to better predict the likelihood that you would not default on an auto loan. Mortgage lenders use a score developed specifically for mortgage loans. Or, your credit or lender might also use a proprietary credit score that’s developed for use by just that company.

If I don’t agree with my FICO® Score, what should I do?

Your FICO® Score is provided to Wells Fargo by Experian® based on information within your credit report on the calculation date (“as of” date). If you feel this information is inaccurate, your next step should be to request a free credit report from annualcreditreport.com. If there’s incorrect information within any of your credit reports, follow each bureau’s instructions on how to dispute that information. If there’s incorrect information about your Wells Fargo accounts, please call the Wells Fargo phone number in your credit report.

Why can I see my FICO® Score, but others on my account can’t see theirs?

You can see your FICO® Score because you are the primary account holder of an eligible account.

Others may not be able to view their scores if:

  • They recently opened a new account
  • They’re an authorized user on someone else’s account
  • They have a billing statement in someone else’s name
  • They do not have an eligible account in Wells Fargo Online®

Can I expect the FICO® Score version I receive from Wells Fargo to change?

FICO® periodically updates its scoring models and Wells Fargo may choose to upgrade to a more updated score version. If this happens, we'll notify you when a change to the score version change occurs. You can locate the score version on your FICO® Score display. It is listed directly below the score and rating.

What if I don’t want Wells Fargo to display my FICO® Score anymore?

You can opt out of the service at any time. On the FICO® Score screen, select the I no longer want Wells Fargo to display my FICO® Score link. If you decide to start the service again in the future, you can select View Your FICO® Credit Score on the Account Summary and follow the instructions to opt back in.

Is there credit education or assistance available to me?

In addition to the Wells Fargo credit insights you receive with your FICO® Score, you can also access the Smarter CreditTM Center and many other resources on wellsfargo.com.
Wells Fargo also has a specialized team of financial health bankers who are ready to help. Available exclusively by phone at 1-877-924-8692 (Mon – Sat, 8 am – 6 pm Central Time), allowing you to have a private conversation about your specific financial goals.


Impacts to FICO® Scores

Will closing a credit card account impact my FICO® Score?

It is possible that closing a credit account may have a negative impact depending on a few factors. FICO® Scores may consider your “credit utilization rate”, which looks at your total used credit in relation to your total available credit. Essentially, it measures how much of your available credit you are actually using. The more of your credit that you use, the higher your utilization rate and high credit utilization rates may negatively impact your FICO® Score. Before you close any credit card account, Wells Fargo recommends that you should first consider whether you really need to close the account or if your real intention is just to stop using that credit card. If you really just want to stop using that card, it may make sense if you stop using the card and put it somewhere for safe keeping in case of an emergency. It’s also important to note that length of your credit history accounts for 15% of your FICO® Score calculation. Therefore, having credit card accounts that are open and in good standing for a long time may affect your FICO® Score.

How does refinancing impact my FICO® Score?

Refinancing and loan modifications may affect your FICO® Scores in a few areas. How much these affect the score depends on whether it’s reported to the consumer reporting agencies as the same loan with changes or as an entirely new loan. There are many reasons why a score may change. FICO® Scores are calculated using many different pieces of credit data in your credit report. This data is grouped into five categories: payment history (35%), amounts owed (30%), length of credit history (15%), new credit (10%) and credit mix (10%). If a refinanced loan or modified loan is reported as the same loan with changes, two pieces of information associated with the loan modification may affect your score: the new credit inquiry and changes to the amounts owed. If a refinanced loan or modified loan is reported as a “new” loan, your score could still be affected by the new credit inquiry and an increase in amounts owed,— along with the additional impact of a new “open date” which may affect the credit history category. In the end, a new or recent open date typically indicates that it is a new credit obligation and, as a result, may impact the score more than if the terms of the existing loan are simply changed.

How do FICO® Scores consider loan shopping?

In general, if you are “loan shopping” - meaning that you are applying for the same type of loan with similar amounts with multiple lenders in a short period of time - your FICO® Score will consider your “shopping” as a single credit inquiry on your score if the shopping occurs within a short time period (30 to 45 day) depending on which FICO® Score version is used by your lenders.

What are the different categories of late payments and do they impact FICO® Scores?

A history of payments is the largest factor in FICO® Scores. FICO® Scores consider late payments in these general areas; how recent the late payments are, how severe the late payments are, and how frequently the late payments occur. So this means that a recent late payment could be more damaging to a FICO® Score than a number of late payments that happened a long time ago. Late payments are listed on credit reports by how late the payments are. Typically, creditors report late payments in one of these categories: 30-days late, 60-days late, 90-days late, 120-days late, 150-days late, or charge off (written off as a loss because of severe delinquency). Of course a 90-day late is worse than a 30-day late, but the important thing to understand is that people who continually pay their bills on time tend to appear less risky to lenders. However, for people who continue not to pay debt, and their creditor either charges it off or sends it to a collection agency, it is considered a significant event with regard to a score and will likely have a severe negative impact.

How does a bankruptcy impact my FICO® Score?

A bankruptcy is considered a very negative event by FICO® Scores. As long as the bankruptcy is listed on your credit report, it will be factored into your scores. How much of an impact it will have on your score will depend on your entire credit profile. As the bankruptcy item ages, its impact on a FICO® Score gradually decreases. Typically, here is how long you can expect bankruptcies to remain on your credit reports (from the date filed):

  • Chapter 11 and 7 bankruptcies up to 10 years.
  • Completed Chapter 13 bankruptcies up to 7 years.

These dates and time periods refer to the public record item associated with filing for bankruptcy. All of the individual accounts included in the bankruptcy should be removed from your credit reports after 7 years.

How do public records and judgments impact FICO® Scores?

Public records are legal documents created and maintained by Federal and local governments, which are usually accessible to the public. Some public records, such as divorces, are not considered by FICO® Scores, but adverse public records, which include bankruptcies, are considered by FICO® Scores. FICO® Scores may be affected by the mere presence of an adverse public record, whether paid or not. Adverse public records will have less effect on a FICO® Score as time passes, but they can remain in your credit reports for up to ten years based on what type of public record it is.

What are inquiries and how do they impact FICO® Scores?

Inquiries may or may not affect FICO® Scores. Credit inquiries are classified as either “hard inquiries” or “soft inquiries”—only hard inquiries have an effect on FICO® Scores.

Soft inquiries are all credit inquiries where your credit is NOT being reviewed by a prospective lender. FICO® Scores do not take into account any involuntary (soft) inquiries made by businesses with which you did not apply for credit, inquiries from employers, or your own requests to see your credit report. Soft inquiries also include inquiries from businesses checking your credit to offer you goods or services (such as promotional offers by credit card companies) and credit checks from businesses with which you already have a credit account. If you are receiving FICO® Scores for free from a business with which you already have a credit account, there is no additional inquiry made on your credit report. FICO® Scores take into account only voluntary (hard) inquiries that result from your application for credit. Hard inquiries include credit checks when you’ve applied for an auto loan, mortgage, credit card or other types of loans. Each of these types of credit checks count as a single inquiry. Inquiries may have a greater impact if you have few accounts or a short credit history. Large numbers of inquiries also mean greater risk.

How does applying for new credit impact my FICO® Score?

Applying for new credit only accounts for about 10% of a FICO® Score. Exactly how much applying for new credit affects your score depends on your overall credit profile and what else is already in your credit reports. For example, applying for new credit may have a greater impact on your FICO® Scores if you only have a few accounts or a short credit history. That said, there are definitely a few things to be aware of depending on the type of credit you are applying for. When you apply for credit, a credit check or “inquiry” can be requested to check your credit standing.

 

If you don't see the answers to your questions:
  • View all FICO Score FAQs , or
  • Call us at 1-855-329-9605, Mon – Fri, 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Central Time, Sat 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Central Time
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